Gita Daily Readings
Today is Swami Venkatesananda's Birthday!

29th December
Chapter
XVIII: 72-73
Has this been heard, Oh Arjuna, with one-pointed mind? Has the delusion of thine ignorance been destroyed, Oh Dhanamjaya?

Arjuna said: Destroyed is my delusion as I have gained my memory (knowledge) through thy grace, Oh Krishna. I am firm, my doubts are gone. I will act according to thy word.

Commentary

If one-pointedness of mind is not gained, we shall not understand or profit by even the word of God. There are many in this world who ask but will not hear! There are others who sit in front of the master, but only physically - their mind is elsewhere. They merely nod their heads at the truths, but the heart is untouched and the gut-level, where the action is, is completely untouched. There are still others who, while listening, mentally carry on an argument, accepting some ideas and rejecting others. This multi-activity only tires them, preventing them from grasping the real meaning of the lesson imparted. They might hear the words, but unless they are supermen, they will miss their depth and complain that the explanations are not satisfactory.

Whilst we do not advocate slavish blind acceptance of any teaching, we do assert that it is better (and less strenuous) to do the hearing first, receive (not necessarily accept) the ideas and "reserve judgment." Once rapport has been established by the teacher and the taught, it is more profitable to self-hypnotize ourselves (not in the technical sense) in order that our finite little egoistic intellect may not interrupt the free flow of supreme wisdom from the lips of the master to our heart. Only then will we be able to declare with Arjuna that "my delusion has been destroyed" and "I have regained the knowledge which was there always" (the knowledge that the body is not the self). The mark of enlightenment is given as doubtlessness - a heart in which there is no doubt at all, and "I am firm" reminds us of the state of the sthitaprajna (sage of firm wisdom) mentioned at the end of the second chapter.

Where does this lead to? We do God's will, joyously participating in the dynamism of nature, egolessly.

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